These aren’t the droids you’re looking for (e-bikes)

E-bikes are here, and the Trek versions are fun, reliable and practical. But they're not going to sell like hybrids when priced like higher-end road or mountain bikes.
E-bikes are here, and the Trek versions are fun, reliable and practical. But they’re not going to sell like hybrids when priced like higher-end road or mountain bikes.

E-bikes, motor-assisted bicycles capable of speeds from 15-28mph with relative ease, are huge in Europe. I mean it’s not just the “next” big thing.. it IS the big thing. Many shops in Germany & Holland & elsewhere are seeing greater sales in e-bikes than in regular bikes. The price range? $3-$5,000 (and up!).

Here in the US, e-bikes are a much tougher sale. We have fantastic bikes from Trek featuring either Shimano’s “Steps” electrical assist, or Bosch. You can’t ride one of them and not have a huge smile on your face. They make you feel like Superman or Wonder Woman. When you hit a hill, they don’t bog down, they don’t complain, they just go, magically adding power that would normally take an unhealthy dose of performance-enhancing-drugs to come even close to.

But sales are only very gradually increasing. And now we’re being told by those heading the lobbying efforts for e-bikes in the US that the LBS (Local Bike Shop) is the problem, and if we don’t get our butts in gear, the e-bike revolution is going to happen elsewhere, outside our stores, and we’ll be left behind. It’s not that simple.

First, this is not Germany or Holland. This is the United States of America gosh dangit and guess what, the e-bike isn’t providing a solution for something that people thought was a problem! It’s an opportunity, not a necessity. We don’t have a strong culture of commuting by bike. Most of our cities weren’t designed before cars came along, like Europe. And those cities that are that old, have been rebuilt, because this is America gosh dangit and we love our cars and want places to park them, so that’s what we got… wide expanses of asphalt (roads) and thousands of square miles of parking lots that displace other uses. Remember the lyrics, “They paved paradise and put up a parking lot.”? It’s real. We did it. Europe didn’t.

Of course, we’re recognizing the problems created by urban sprawl and cities that favor cars over people. Change is coming, even to Redwood City California, where I sit on the city council’s “Complete Streets” committee. It’s going to be a very different attitude towards bikes and cars 10 years down the road. I promise. Everyone sees that happening. Too many people and not enough room for all of their cars, so other solutions became inevitable.

Don't be too proud of this technological marvel you've constructed. Your ability to sell an e-bike is insignificant next to the power of a real brand name. That brand name is Tesla. That would put e-bikes on the map in the US. (My response to an e-bike industry expert's attempt to lay blame on the local bike shop for the e-bikes lack of success so far)

But that’s not today. Today that awesome e-bike is not a real need but rather a cool want. A cool want that is priced beyond the means of many, and is coming before it’s really practical to go without a car. But the e-bike industry continues to maintain that weak sales are because we, your local bicycle shop, aren’t getting behind them like we should. Despite bringing in quite a few different models, getting trained on how to work with them, and committing expensive floor space to their display. In plain & simple terms, the e-bike is a growing niche market. It is not mainstream, and until it becomes mainstream, it’s not going to sell in huge numbers at local bike shops across America. Sounds like a conundrum. They won’t sell in bike shops until bike shops can sell lots of them.

In a nutshell, the e-bike is just a bit ahead of its time in the US. Then again, that’s what people thought about electric cars, for years. They were always “the next big thing” from year to year to year. Until this guy named Musk came along and created the Tesla. Unfortunately, Musk is a one-in-a-million person, someone with business sense, marketing acumen and willing to bet the farm that his ideas can change the world. But even then it hasn’t been easy; Tesla was not his first try but rather a huge play he could make due to past successes.past successes He’s got one thing in common with the e-bike puppeteers… he’s a dreamer. Big vision. But where things differ is in his financial power to make the play. Might not hurt that he has degrees in Economics and Physics either.

If Telsa had an e-bike, that would be the equivalent of the Apple iPod for many. That’s what it would take to achieve almost-overnight success in the market. But going on and on about how successful they are elsewhere indicates a lock of understanding the differences between “here” and “there.” Visions and dreams are not enough to accomplish success at the rate they believe possible. Not with a $3-4k bike anyway. The utility cycling market in the US would buy large numbers of $1500 e-bikes. That’s where the market is. Just saying you can’t produce a decent bike in that price range doesn’t justify a belief that you can sell large numbers at a price range where you can.

Don’t get me wrong; the present high-quality e-bikes we sell, from Trek, with Shimano and Bosch mid-drive motors, are awesome! They are amazingly versatile, have great range (about the same as my wife’s Chevy Volt) and great reliability. Fantastic improvement over what we had just 4 years ago, and that 4 years ago product worked out great for my wife. It’s just not the breakthrough, everyone-must-have product that is required at the $1500 price point. We’ve got the equivalent of a Tesla S ($80k car) and we need to do exactly what Ellon Musk did… create a Model 3 ($35k car) that delivers 80%+ of what the Tesla S offers. That will put e-bikes into the mainstream here in the US.

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Back and happy to be on the bike!

One of many reasons why we ride. How many times have I taken "this" picture? Not quite as many times as the obligatory West Old LaHonda photo showing the fog coming in from the coast, but still, quite a few times. Perhaps because it crops nicely for a header photo.
One of many reasons why we ride. How many times have I taken “this” picture? Not quite as many times as the obligatory West Old LaHonda photo showing the fog coming in from the coast, but still, quite a few times. Perhaps because it crops nicely for a header photo.

So why no entries since last Sunday? Mostly because I spend Monday-Thursday at the Interbike trade show in Las Vegas. Far too much time off a bike, far too much time living like an above-ground mole-person, not once leaving for “air” from the moment I checked in until the moment I left. It was important to be there; I’m on the National Bicycle Dealer Association’s Board of Directors and we had quite a bit of business to take care of. But being off the bike…

So what happens if I’m off a bike? First, you can literally add half a pound a day to my weight. It doesn’t stabilize for about 6 days or so. Second, my legs hurt. I mean they really, really hurt. My whole body starts to hurt when I don’t ride. I get stiff joints in places I didn’t know I had joints.

If you haven't tried to latest Camelbak insulated bottles, you should! Still ice in there after two hours on a hot day. Impressive!
If you haven’t tried to latest Camelbak insulated bottles, you should! Still ice in there after two hours on a hot day. Impressive!

I got home Thursday night, and Friday, got to at least ride to work & back. Not much, but just a few miles feels a lot nicer than zero miles! And then today… today it was time to jump back in, get out on a real ride, a repeat of last-week’s ride that was supposed to be, the one where Kevin had the kidney pain that caused him to have to sag back and me to re-route things a bit. Back to the usual… Old LaHonda/Pescadero/Tunitas.

It wasn’t fast or pretty, but it was fun. Kevin had few problems with the full route, although he was getting pretty tired on Tunitas. Not unexpected, since he skipped both the regular Tuesday & Thursday-morning rides while I was gone. That catches up to you. In fact, neither he nor his sister even rode to work during the week. Talk about slackers! So we took it easy until we got over Haskins (on the way to Pescadero) and fought through a headwind that didn’t respect our notion of easy.

The pigs on Stage Road
The pigs on Stage Road

Big disappointment in Pescadero. Not just the fire that burned out one of the stores in town, but the lack of any large cookies at Arcangeli Bakery! Just substandard-size oatmeal-raisin that didn’t qualify for purchase, much less a photo.

There was something out there looking slower than us today though. The pigs on Stage Road, a mile or two north of Pescadero. Did I mention the heat? Yes, it was pretty warm, and the pigs were making the best of a large mud pond. A few just sleeping in it, with little piglets running around the edge. Very cute.

Pay attention to the Tunitas Creek area roadwork infor here!
Pay attention to the Tunitas Creek area roadwork infor here!

Tunitas? Like I said, we took it easy; it wasn’t until it leveled out that Kevin decided to kick the pace up (way up), which he sustained for 3/4 of the finale until blowing apart. It was ugly; he went from riding flat-out to looking like he might stall and fall over. I went to the front and encouraged the pace the rest of the way; he gradually came back up to speed.

Was it hot out there? Not too bad, really. Highest temp we saw was 90; I think riding in France each July¬†has acclimated us to warmer temps. We did see quite a few cyclists taking a break here and there though, on both Old LaHonda and Tunitas. But all too soon we’ll be complaining it’s getting cold and griping about having to wear leg warmers and base layers again. Right, like 50 degrees will be so cold, when much of the country might be dealing with ice! Northern California is a great place to ride.

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